CHOCOLATE CAROB TREES IN GROW BAGS 50-90CM TALL 4 SALE HERE ONLINE AUSTRALIA

home / CHOCOLATE CAROB TREES IN GROW BAGS 50-90CM TALL 4 SALE HERE ONLINE AUSTRALIA

CHOCOLATE CAROB TREES IN GROW BAGS 50-90CM TALL 4 SALE HERE ONLINE AUSTRALIA

$38.00

Carob, dried or roasted and having a slightly sweet taste, in powder or chip form, is used as an ingredient in cakes and cookies. Carob is sometimes used as a substitute for chocolate. The seeds, also known as locust beans, are used as animal feed. They are also the source of locust bean gum, a thickening agent used in numerous processed foods. In Egypt, carobs are consumed as a snack. Crushed pods are used to make a refreshing drink. Compotes and liqueurs are made from carob in Turkey, Malta, Portugal, Spain and Sicily. Carob has proven effective in relieving diarrhea in infants. In Libya, a syrup extracted from carob named rub is used as a complement to an Asida meal. The so-called carob syrup made in Peru is actually from the fruit of the Prosopis nigra tree.

Carob has also been used as a non-toxic alternative to chocolate in dog treats, as the theobromine in chocolate is fatally toxic to all animals, even humans in high enough doses (in raw form).

C. siliqua also contains leucodelphinidin, a colorless chemical compound.

THE PRODUCT BEING OFFERED HERE FOR SALE IS A LIVE PLANT 50-90CM TALL IN GROW BAGS FOR $38.This will change with time.

Inquire at the link at the foot of this posting

Description

A carat is a modern unit of weight for gemstones like diamonds. … A carat is defined as exactly 0.20 grams. This means that a diamond weighing 100 carats would be 20 grams. Well, according to some, a typical carob seed is about 0.20 grams (200 mg), so the same diamond would weight just about the same as 100 carob seeds www.www-gems.com 

Although it seems that carob seeds were used as a standard of weight, they were probably also used as a good way to fleece people, as it would be pretty simple to keep a heavier set and a lighter set on hand in order to use the one that suited your needs at the time. If you were selling, the lighter set would fit the bill. If you were buying, then the heavier set would be to your advantage.

Modern uses

Carob, dried or roasted and having a slightly sweet taste, in powder or chip form, is used as an ingredient in cakes and cookies. Carob is sometimes used as a substitute for chocolate. The seeds, also known as locust beans, are used as animal feed. They are also the source of locust bean gum, a thickening agent used in numerous processed foods. In Egypt, carobs are consumed as a snack. Crushed pods are used to make a refreshing drink. Compotes and liqueurs are made from carob in Turkey, Malta, Portugal, Spain and Sicily. Carob has proven effective in relieving diarrhea in infants. In Libya, a syrup extracted from carob named rub is used as a complement to an Asida meal. The so-called carob syrup made in Peru is actually from the fruit of the Prosopis nigra tree.

Carob has also been used as a non-toxic alternative to chocolate in dog treats, as the theobromine in chocolate is fatally toxic to all animals, even humans in high enough doses (in raw form).

C. siliqua also contains leucodelphinidin, a colorless chemical compound.

THE PRODUCT BEING OFFERED HERE FOR SALE IS A LIVE PLANT 60-90CM TALL IN GROW BAGS FOR $38.This will change with time.

Inquire at the link at the foot of this posting as to what is available.

Traditional uses
Carob was eaten in Ancient Egypt. It was also a common sweetener and was used in the hieroglyph for “sweet” (nedjem). Dried carob fruit is traditionally eaten on the Jewish holiday of Tu Bishvat. Carob juice drinks are traditionally drunk during the Islamic month of Ramadan. Also it is believed to be an aphrodisiac.
In Cyprus the carob syrup is known as Cyprus’s black gold, and is widely exported.
On the islands of Malta and Gozo a syrup (ġulepp tal-ħarrub) is made out of carob pods. This is a traditional medicine for coughs and sore throat. A traditional sweet, eaten during Lent and Good Friday, is also made from carob pods in Malta. However, carob pods were mainly used as animal fodder in the Maltese Islands, apart from times of famine or war when they formed part of the diet of many Maltese.
In the Iberian Peninsula carob pods were used mainly as animal fodder, especially to feed donkeys.
Carob pods were an important source of sugar before sugarcane and sugar beets became widely available.[citation needed]

Carob powder is made from the bean shaped pods that grow on the carob tree which originates in the Eastern Mediterranean. The pods are sometimes used to make syrup that is used in foods, but more commonly, they are used to make carob powder, which is often utilized as a chocolate substitute in baking and making candy. Carob is high in nutrients and antioxidants and here are ten of the health benefits of carob powder

Bulk carob seeds extracted from the pods below.

Health benefits of the carob tree fruits in a video here to watch.

Ceratonia siliqua, the scientific name of the carob tree, derives from the Greek kerátiοn (κεράτιον), “fruit of the carob” (from keras [κέρας] “horn”), and Latin siliqua “pod, carob.” The term “carat“, the unit by which diamond weight is measured, is also derived from the Greek word kerátiοn (κεράτιον), alluding to an ancient practice of weighing gold and gemstones against the seeds of the carob tree by people in the Middle EastThe system was eventually standardized, and one carat was fixed at 0.2 grams.

There appears to be some devout believers in the health benefits of carob.

What Does the Word Carat Have to Do with Carob Seeds?

In late Roman times, the pure gold coin known as the solidus weighed 24 carat seeds (about 4.5 grams). As a result, the carat also became a measure of purity for gold. Thus 24-carat gold means 100% pure, 12-carat gold means the alloy contains 50% gold, etc.

Subsistence on carob pods is mentioned in the Talmud: Berakhot reports that Rabbi Haninah subsisted on carob pods.[1] It is probably also mentioned in the New Testament, in which Matthew 3:4 reports that John the Baptist subsisted on “locusts and wild honey”; the Greek word translated “locusts” may refer to carob pods, rather than to grasshoppers. Again, in Luke 15:16, when the Prodigal Son is in the field in spiritual and social poverty, he desires to eat the pods that he is feeding to the swine because he is suffering from starvation. The use of the carob during a famine is likely a result of the carob tree’s resilience to the harsh climate and drought. During a famine, the swine were given carob pods so that they would not be a burden on the farmer’s limited resources.

During the Second World War, it was common for the people of Malta to eat dried carob pods and prickly pears as a supplement to rationed food. This had been also common during past famines and wars.

A carat is a modern unit of weight for gemstones like diamonds. This is not to be confused with karatwhich is a measure of gold purity. A carat is defined as exactly 0.20 grams. This means that a diamond weighing 100 carats would be 20 grams. Well, according to some, a typical carob seed is about 0.20 grams (200 mg), so the same diamond would weight just about the same as 100 carob seeds. Yep, the modern word carat owes its derivation to the same pathway that named the carob, which was originally used by Arab jewelers to weigh their precious metals and stones.

You can see the resemblance in its Greek name keration and its Latin name Ceratonia.2,3,4Although carob seeds would never be acceptable by today’s standards and according to this paper, they are no more consistent in mass than a lot of other seeds. 5

You can see the resemblance in its Greek name keration and its Latin name Ceratonia.2,3,4Although carob seeds would never be acceptable by today’s standards and according to this paper, they are no more consistent in mass than a lot of other seeds. 5

The ancient carob fruit is now coming back into the marketplace with nuts.

Small carob plants in  200mm grow pots below.

RELATED INFO LINKS BELOW

www.foodpassions.net

www.www-gems.com

www.worldwidediamonds.info

www.h2o-water.com

www.newcures.info

www.pythonjungle.com

Henry Sapiecha

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