BUNYA NUT GROUND INTO FLOUR 4 SALE IN PACKS HERE AUSTRALIA ONLINE

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BUNYA NUT GROUND INTO FLOUR 4 SALE IN PACKS HERE AUSTRALIA ONLINE

$6.00

The product being offered here for sale in the ground Bunya Nut Flour

Araucaria bidwillii commonly known as a bunya nut pine, and has held both cultural and culinary significance for Australia’s first peoples for thousands of years. It can grow to a height of 140 feet and is both majestic and dangerous when it reaches maturity. The danger is its bowling ball sized cones, which have been known to kill when falling onto unsuspecting victims or vehicles when parked underneath the falling cones, which can weigh as much as 22lb (10kg). If you don’t think this is a big deal, you should know that they were dinosaur food millions of years ago – bunya pines have been on earth for that long.

If you just want a sample to try buy our 35 gram pack for $6.00 or for the adventurist cook our 200 gram pack for $12.00 is definately the way to go. Pack/post charges are extra. $5 & $9 Australia wide in that order.

Larger quantities & international buyers need to get a quote HERE

Description

The product being offered here for sale in the ground Bunya Nut Flour

Araucaria bidwillii commonly known as a bunya nut pine, and has held both cultural and culinary significance for Australia’s first peoples for thousands of years. It can grow to a height of 140 feet and is both majestic and dangerous when it reaches maturity.

The danger is its bowling ball sized cones, which have been known to kill when falling onto unsuspecting victims or vehicles when parked underneath the falling cones, which can weigh as much as 22lb (10kg). If you don’t think this is a big deal, you should know that they were dinosaur food millions of years ago – bunya pines have been on earth for that long.

Each mature Bunya cone consists of approximately 60-100 seeds attached to a core. The seeds are edible, having a flavour similar to chestnut. However they do have a tough, leathery texture when eaten raw. The nuts are considerably more palatable when they are roasted, boiled or are ground into a flour for making a sweet bread. Additionally an alcoholic drink was produced by fermenting the seeds by storing them for several months, buried in clay.
Bunya trees are indigenous to south eastern Queensland in the area encompassing the Blackall ranges.

From late December through to March the seeds may be harvested, however Bunya cones will only develop a plentiful harvest once every 2-3 years.The abundance of the seed facilitated massive gatherings, having been invited by messenger, where aboriginal people would talk lore, marriage and ceremony, and then travel back to their country.

There’s a link between bunya seed dispersal and ceremony; they’re indicative of connectivity across landscapes and languages.The family groups would camp nearby and take part in large inter-tribal ceremonies before returning to their own countries. The festival was an opportunity for people to come together in harmony and also for the important business of trade, to share knowledge, stories, song, tools, weapons and dance.

Today we have the internet and we are losing this social interaction. Many of our early settlers had a horror of eating anything their European forebears hadn’t brought to Australia with them, so tended to undervalue this useful and tasty food. They even invented the myth that the little green shoot within the nut is poisonous. In reality, it is just as edible as the rest of the nut, and only adds to its nutritional value.

Bunya nuts are seasonal and can only be obtained fresh from about January to March each year, however you can buy them frozen from some suppliers or you can freeze your own supply. When the nuts are boiled in water, the water turns red, making a flavoursome tea. These nuts when cooked taste sweet and are starchy similar to the taste of chestnuts or potatoes.

The nutritional content of the bunya nut is: 40% water, 40% complex carbohydrates, 9% protein, 2% fat, 0.2% potassium, 0.06% magnesium. Bunya nut is gluten free and hence the flour made from it is considered to be an ideal substitute for people having gluten intolerance. Bunya nut has a healthy glycemic index (GI) rating, in the range of 50 to 75.

Studies indicate that bunya nut extract exhibits anti-bacterial activity and hence has the potential to be used as food additives to slow down food spoilage caused by bacteria and also to inhibit food borne illnesses.  Using this natural additive can therefore do away with the need for adding chemical preservatives. Furthermore, the antibacterial properties of bunya nut extract may also have promise in the medical field as they can be used as antibiotic or anti-microbial agents.

If the cones are intact after hitting the ground, you need to break open the cone and separate the nuts from it. Unlike other nuts like the walnuts, the bunya nuts have a leathery and tough shell and will not break open easily.

The nuts need to be cooked for a good 30 to 45 minutes. Some people choose to boil them in brine, as this method tends to give the nuts a salty and savory taste. Bunya nut is nowadays used as an ingredient in making a vast variety of dishes including casseroles, pies, quiches, pastas, pancakes, porridge, hummus, pesto, biscuits, desserts, cakes, and breads. It is most popularly used as a ‘bush food’ (bush tucker) by the native food enthusiasts.

There is no doubt that extracting the nuts from the cone is not an easy task. First you must remove them from the nut capsule, secondly you have to remove them from their pod and thirdly you need to remove the hard shell that encases the flesh of the nut. Cooking the nut in the shell does make it easier to peel. Making the bunya nut flour is more difficult but it is worth the effort. Luckily we do all the hard work and you can purchase bunya nut flour all year round from this site.

If you just want a sample to try buy our 35 gram pack $6.00 or for the adventurist cook our 200 gram pack for $12.00 is definately the way to go. Pack/post charges are extra.

Find the recipe for Bunya Nut Cheesecake with caramel sauce and other delicious Bunya Nut recipes at www.foodpassions.net and don’t forget that if you use our product and design a fabulous recipe send it to us with a photo and we will add it to our recipe section. HERE

Happy baking!

WANT TO GROW YOUR OWN BUNYA NUT TREES??? I CAN HELP YOU.

YES, & I HAVE A NUMBER OF THESE LIVE TREES FOR SALE ALSO IN DIFFERENT SIZES IN GROW BAGS-JUST INQUIRE. HERE

www.ozrural.com.au

www.auctiontraders.net

www.foodpassions.net

www.pythonjungle.com

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

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